A family in Ocean County, Maryland fell victim to a new type of automobile theft — a key fob signal hack that allowed thieves to unlock their $50,000 Chevy Suburban and drive off with it. While still apparently rare, recent reports have raised law enforcement concerns about the relatively new ability for a tech-savvy thief to hack into a vehicle’s key fob, open the door and steal the car. The threat is called a ‘relay attack,’ Michael Tanji, chief operating officer for the cybersecurity firm Senrio Inc., told ABC News. Basically, the attackers grab the signal being transmitted by a nearby key fob using a special receiver. That receiver then ‘relays’ that signal to the car, allowing the thief to unlock it and even start the ignition. Tanji explained that although these attacks are happening, there is not enough data to show how often they are occurring nationwide. “Just because a thing can happen doesn’t mean that it will or that it is even likely,” Tanji said. The National Insurance Crime Bureau, a non-profit organization that combats insurance fraud, tested out a relay attack device, but protected the fob by storing it in a metal box. T...