The solar paradigm of creating singular nanomaterials that possess unprecedented photonic, tribological, electronic, and catalytic properties is arguably far less familiar than the energy-saving paradigms of solar photovoltaics and solar thermal systems. Much of the research in this field has evolved over the past decade from our collaborations (i.e., between researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel). Although the first fullerenes (hollow closed-cage nanostructures) and nanotubes were made from pure carbon, in the 1990s it was realized that a rich landscape of inorganic candidates—made from compounds that possess comparably layered crystal structures (see Figure 1)—should also exist.1 These compounds have strong covalent bonds within the plane, and weak interplane van der Waals forces that become relatively insignificant at high temperature (where thermal fluctuations can shear, bend, and fold molecular sheets into fullerene-like and tubular nanostructures).1 The first non-carbon success stories were tungsten disulfide (WS2) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), produced via pulsed-laser ablation and high-temperature chemistry in...