Archaeological work at Bath Abbey has uncovered the echoes of centuries of religious life. This elaborate tiled floor dates from the late 13th or early 14th century, and would have adorned the huge medieval cathedral that once stood on the site. (ALL IMAGE: Wessex Archaeology) The city of Bath is famous for its spectacular Roman remains and Georgian architecture – but in the medieval period it was also home to one of the largest cathedrals in England. Constructed between the 1090s and the 1160s, this soaring religious building would have been an imposing sight, yet by the beginning of the 16th century its once-grand walls lay in ruins, and its remains today lie beneath Bath Abbey. Now, though, traces of the long-lost cathedral – as well as the Anglo-Saxon monastery that preceded it – are being brought to light once more through excavations by Wessex Archaeology. The opportunity to investigate came thanks to the Bath Abbey Footprint project, a £19.3 million Heritage Lottery Fund initiative to repair the Abbey’s collapsing floor; install a new eco-friendly heating system using the same hot springs that inspired the Romans to build their great temple to Sulis-Minerva and propelled ...